fems

Fire and EMS Department
 

DC Agency Top Menu


-A +A
Bookmark and Share

EMS Response Time

EMS response time performance measurements evaluate “response time” by FEMS emergency vehicles to EMS (G1) Class 2 (C2) and Class 3 (C3) incidents (please click here for an explanation of FEMS call types). “Higher Priority” EMS calls (C2) are considered “time sensitive” and “potentially life threatening,” meaning delayed response by FEMS emergency vehicles may impact patient outcome. “Highest Priority” EMS calls (C3) are considered “very time sensitive” and “immediately life threatening,” meaning delayed response by FEMS emergency vehicles will negatively impact patient outcome.

For each C2 and C3 EMS call, a FEMS “first responder” and “transport unit” respond to the call. One of these emergency vehicles is staffed by a Paramedic. A responding unit may be a fire truck, Ambulance or Medic Unit (both “transport units”). Fire trucks can be staffed with EMTs or Paramedics (at least 4 crew members). Ambulances are staffed by EMTs (2 crew members), Medic Units are staffed by a Paramedic and EMT (2 crew members). For C3 EMS calls, a FEMS “first responder,” “transport unit” and “EMS Supervisor” often respond to the call. “EMS Supervisors” (1 crew member) are senior Paramedic Captains, adding a second Paramedic to the responding units. 

EMS First Response.  C2 and C3 EMS calls require a first responder because the series of questions asked by the 9-1-1 call taker established that patient condition is “urgent” and either “potentially” or “immediately life threatening.” First responders (usually fire trucks staffed with EMTs or Paramedics) arrive more quickly to evaluate and treat life threatening patient conditions. NFPA Standard 1710 establishes a 60 second “turnout time” and 240 second “travel time” (together, 300 seconds or 5 minute first “response time”) benchmark time goal for not less than 90% of dispatched incidents (please click here and refer to Page 17 for a detailed description). The FEMS KPI measure for this benchmark time goal is the “percentage of high priority EMS calls when a first responding EMT arrived in 5 minutes or less.” The tables below show the percentage of C2 and C3 EMS incidents meeting the benchmark time goal during FY 2017 and FY 2018 (beginning October 1, 2016) with the yearly total shown for the current fiscal year.

EMS Incidents (G1): Percentage of high priority (C2 and C3) EMS calls when a first responding EMT arrived in 5 minutes or less.
FY 17 (12-A) FEMS-G1-C2-3-RT-FR.png
FY 17 (11-A) FEMS-G1-C2-3-RT-FR.png

EMS First Response and First Paramedic.  C2 EMS calls require both a first responder and Paramedic because the series of questions asked by the 9-1-1 call taker established that patient condition is “urgent” and “potentially life threatening.” First responders (usually fire trucks staffed with EMTs or Paramedics) arrive more quickly to evaluate and treat life threatening patient conditions. NFPA Standard 1710 establishes a 300 second or 5 minute first “response time” goal for not less than 90% of these type incidents. Additionally, C2 EMS calls require an “advanced life support (ALS) unit” staffed by a Paramedic to provide definitive prehospital care for patients. Because FEMS deploys Paramedics individually on fire trucks and Medic Units (1 Paramedic crew member on both units), either emergency vehicle arriving at a C2 EMS call could provide ALS patient care and meet the requirement. NFPA Standard 1710 establishes a 60 second “turnout time” and 480 second “travel time” (together, 540 seconds or 9 minute “response time”) benchmark time goal for “the arrival of an advanced life support (ALS) unit at an emergency medical incident” at not less than 90% of dispatched incidents (please click here and refer to Page 23 for a detailed description). The FEMS KPI measure for these combined benchmark time goals is the “percentage of higher priority EMS calls when a first responding EMT arrived in 5 minutes or less and a Paramedic arrived in 9 minutes or less.” The tables below shows the percentage of C2 EMS incidents meeting the benchmark time goals during FY 2017 FY 2018 (beginning October 1, 2016) with the yearly total shown for the current fiscal year.

EMS Incidents (G1): Percentage of higher priority (C2) EMS calls when a first responding EMT arrived in 5 minutes or less and a Paramedic arrived in 9 minutes or less.
FY 17 (12-B) FEMS-G1-C2-RT-FR-1ALS - Copy.png
FY 17 (11-B) FEMS-G1-C2-RT-FR-1ALS.png
 
EMS First Response and Two Paramedics.  C3 EMS calls require both a first responder and two Paramedics because the series of questions asked by the 9-1-1 call taker established that patient condition is “urgent” and “immediately life threatening.” First responders (usually fire trucks staffed with EMTs or Paramedics) arrive more quickly to evaluate and treat life threatening patient conditions. NFPA Standard 1710 establishes a 300 second or 5 minute first “response time” goal for not less than 90% of these type incidents. Additionally, C3 EMS calls require an “advanced life support (ALS) unit” staffed by a Paramedic to provide definitive prehospital care for patients. However, NFPA Standard 1710 also describes that “a minimum of two members trained at the EMT-Paramedic level” shall arrive at the incident to meet this requirement. Because FEMS deploys Paramedics individually on fire trucks and Medic Units (1 Paramedic crew member on either unit), both emergency vehicles (or either emergency vehicle in combination with an EMS Supervisor) arriving at a C3 EMS call could provide ALS patient care and meet the requirement. NFPA Standard 1710 establishes a 60 second “turnout time” and 480 second “travel time” (together, 540 seconds or 9 minute “response time”) benchmark time goal for “the arrival of an advanced life support (ALS) unit at an emergency medical incident” with “a minimum of two members trained at the EMT-Paramedic level” at not less than 90% of dispatched incidents (please click here and refer to Page 23 for a detailed description). The FEMS KPI measure for these combined benchmark time goals is the “percentage of highest priority EMS calls when a first responding EMT arrived in 5 minutes or less and two Paramedics arrived in 9 minutes or less.” The tables below show the percentage of C3 EMS incidents meeting the benchmark time goals during FY 2017 and FY 2018 (beginning October 1, 2016) with the yearly total shown for the current fiscal year.
 
EMS Incidents (G1): Percentage of highest priority (C3) EMS calls when a first responding EMT arrived in 5 minutes or less and two Paramedics arrived in 9 minutes or less.
FY 17 (12-C) FEMS-G1-C3-RT-FR-2ALS.png
FY 17 (11-C) FEMS-G1-C3-RT-FR-2ALS.png

EMS First FEMS Transport Unit.  C2 and C3 EMS calls require the response of an FEMS transport unit because the series of questions asked by the 9-1-1 call taker established that patient condition is “urgent” and either “potentially” or “immediately life threatening.” Transport units, including both Medic Units (staffed by a Paramedic and EMT) and Ambulances (staffed by EMTs) provide advanced life support (ALS) and basic life support (BLS) patient transport to regional hospitals. Although NFPA Standard 1710 has not established a benchmark time goal for this type emergency vehicle, FEMS has established a 60 second “turnout time” and 480 second “travel time” (together, 540 seconds or 9 minute “response time”) benchmark time goal “for the arrival of the first ALS or BLS transport unit at an emergency medical incident” for not less than 90% of dispatched incidents (please click here and refer to Page 26 for a detailed description). In the FEMS deployment model, transport units may be considered the first responding EMT or Paramedic emergency vehicle. The FEMS KPI measure for this benchmark time goal is the “percentage of high priority EMS calls when a FEMS transport unit arrived in 9 minutes or less.” The tables below show the percentage of C2 and C3 EMS incidents meeting the benchmark time goal during FY 2017 and FY 2018 (beginning October 1, 2016) with the yearly total shown for the current fiscal year.

EMS Incidents (G1): Percentage of high priority (C2 and C3) EMS calls when a FEMS transport unit arrived in 9 minutes or less.
FY 17 (12-D) FEMS-G1-C2-3-RT-FTU.png
FY 17 (11-D) FEMS-G1-C2-3-RT-FTU.png