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Fire and EMS Department
 

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RESPONSE TIME

Starting in October 2015, the Fire and Emergency Medical Services Department (FEMS) began using National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) Standard 1710 (please click here to access NFPA Codes and Standards) performance measures for data reporting purposes. Previously, FEMS used performance measures recommended by other authorities, including the International City and County Managers Association (ICMA). 
 
As part of this new effort, FEMS updated response time goals and requirements to align with NFPA Standard 1710 measures. These measures were incorporated in Fiscal Year 2016 (FY 2016) Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) and described in the Department’s FY 2016 Performance Plan. NFPA Standard 1710 establishes benchmark time goals for 90% of dispatched calls by call type. Call types are divided into EMS and Fire. FEMS “response time” consists of “turnout time” and “travel time” to the call (please click here and refer to Pages 10 through 14 for a more detailed description).  FEMS uses call “Groups” and “Classes” that sort calls into categories. Each category is matched with NFPA Standard 1710 measures and FEMS KPIs.
 
EMS response time performance measurements evaluate response time by FEMS emergency vehicles to EMS (G1) Class 2 (C2) and Class 3 (C3) incidents (please click here for an explanation of FEMS call types). “Higher Priority” EMS calls (C2) are considered “time sensitive” and “potentially life threatening,” meaning delayed response by FEMS emergency vehicles may impact patient outcome. “Highest Priority” EMS calls (C3) are considered “very time sensitive” and “immediately life threatening,” meaning delayed response by FEMS emergency vehicles will negatively impact patient outcome. Fire response time performance measurements evaluate response time by FEMS emergency vehicles to Fire (G2) Class 3 (C3) “structure fire” incidents. “Highest Priority” Fire calls (C3) are considered “very time sensitive” and “immediately life threatening,” meaning delayed response by FEMS emergency vehicles will result in loss of life or destruction of property.